ENDBRINGER
/
PRESSING A FLOWER BETWEEN PLANES
/
HEAVEN AS HIGH AS THIS

 ENDBRINGER / PRESSING A FLOWER BETWEEN PLANES / HEAVEN AS HIGH AS THIS was a performance with three titles, known in short as simply ENDBRINGER, written and directed by Patrick Michael Ballard for the closing of Jace Space, an artist run space in Los Angeles. The music for the work was written by Eli Klausner, the harp played by Melissa Achten-Klausner, and the drums by Dan Bruinooge. The piece revolves around a singular figure and wearable sculpture created by the artist. In the wake of the everything-ending entity waking from its universe-long slumber, a single stir of its body, and everything crumbles. In the moment after the end of everything, it too begins to dissipate in the void of nothingness, accompanied only by a single edifice, condensed remnants, the last of the physical universe conglomerated at the point of disappearance. The piece happens entirely in this instant, drawing out an extended monologue of inner thoughts as the creature’s body breaks down, with the sculptures being destroyed over the course of the performance. The sculpture worn is deconstructed through the thrashing movements of a body retching to hold onto existence, and the edifice is burned in the final, post-humous scene of the piece, extending up as a plume of smoke into the atmosphere. The work is performed only at an end, and each time it is performed, the costume is mended in new ways, and new appendages are added to the costume.

(Left) The silicone headpiece documented pre-performance, before the black mantle of the creature’s head was affixed over it. (Right)  ALL THAT REMAINS , a sculpture made from over one thousand tiny skulls cast in potassium nitrate and sugar. All of the dirt from the floor of the Jace Space was swept to its base where it was spotlit by a framing projector from above.

(Left) The silicone headpiece documented pre-performance, before the black mantle of the creature’s head was affixed over it. (Right) ALL THAT REMAINS, a sculpture made from over one thousand tiny skulls cast in potassium nitrate and sugar. All of the dirt from the floor of the Jace Space was swept to its base where it was spotlit by a framing projector from above.

(Left) Dan Bruinooge and Melissa Achten-Klausner readying for the final scene outside of the space. (Right) Documentation of the black mantle and segmented appendages draping limp from the creature.

(Left) Dan Bruinooge and Melissa Achten-Klausner readying for the final scene outside of the space. (Right) Documentation of the black mantle and segmented appendages draping limp from the creature.

Interior of Jace Space from where Eli Klausner performed the digital audio aspects of the composition.

Interior of Jace Space from where Eli Klausner performed the digital audio aspects of the composition.

Above are documents of the monologue, rerecorded without the theatrics, gurgles, and silences of the original performance, so that the words of the text can be understood. The second recording is the music written by Eli Klausner for the monologue scene.